The Essence of Being Well

Since qualifying and practising as a massage therapist, I have become a big essential oil enthusiast and blender. I love the different aromas and all the different benefits they can have.

After spending years researching and learning, I have created my own unique blends for skincare and other ailments , that my family and I have benefited from. Please go to my products page to see some of my favourite and most liked blends.

Most traditional blends are be made up from 30% top note oils, 50% middle note oils and 20% base note oils. So if your blend was 10 drops in total, you’d use 3 drops of a top note, 5 of a middle note and 2 of a base note.

These blends then can be :

  • Diluted with a carrier oil,
  • Added to distilled water and maybe spoonful of non-scented or low scented alcohol to help (used to solubilize (‘dissolve’) essential oils into water based sprays so they can be blended or diluted without separating) into a spray bottle
  • Or maybe just carry a few drops on a cotton ball to inhale from time to time

Blends can be made up for mental and physical health benefits as well as for the aromatic purposes.

Below I am going to update you with the health benefits and general information of each essentials oil , hope it helps you decide on your perfect blend and you enjoy mixing as much as I do ! If you would like any blends making up and sending out to you , please get in touch at info@hdtherapy.co.uk or call me on 01484810330.

I only use organic certified (SOIL), MS and GC tested essential oils and products. I avoid palm product and try to be as environmentally friendly as I can.

Essentials Oils

Top Notes

Middles notes

Base Notes

Balsam Peru

Topically, Peru Balsam has been used over the years to help remedy a number of skin issues including dry skin, and minor cuts and wounds. That could possibly lead a number of people to use it without proper precaution or without properly diluting it first. Proper dilution and doing a skin patch test is strongly recommended. Robert Tisserand mentions that Peru Balsam Oil may cause possible sensitization in some individuals. Based on the information I’ve read from various sources, I recommend avoiding it for any topical use.

Emotionally, Peru Balsam Essential Oil is soothing and is nice to diffuse in a candle diffuser. It’s very thick, so be careful if trying to diffuse it in a nebulizer.

Although Peru Balsam is soothing and can help during times of stress, it can act as a stimulant.

  • Botanical Name – Myroxylon balsamum / Myroxylon pereirae
  • Common Method of Extraction – Steam Distilled
  • Plant Part Typically Used – Balsam
  • Color – Dark Brown
  • Consistency – Very Thick
  • Perfumery Note – Base
  • Strength of Initial Aroma – Medium

Aromatic Description

Peru Balsam Essential Oil smells sweet, fresh, earthy and balsamic.

Peru Balsam Essential Oil Uses

  • Bronchitis
  • Chapped Skin
  • Colds
  • Coughing
  • Eczema
  • Flu
  • Poor Circulation
  • Rashes
  • Sensitive Skin
  • Stress

Source: Julia Lawless, The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Updated Edition) (London: Harper Thorsons, 2014), 43.

Major Constituents

  • Benzoic Acid
  • Cinnamic Acid
  • Benzyl Cinnamate
  • Cinnamyl Cinnamate

Source: Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 181.

Peru Balsam Essential Oil Safety Information

Tisserand and Young indicate that there is moderate risk of skin sensitisation when using Peru Balsam Oil. They recommend adhering to IFRA’s 0.4% maximum. [Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 390-391.]

This essential oil poses a higher risk of causing irratation and sensitisation when used in the bath. Avoid using it in the bath, even if it is solubilized/diluted.

Basil

Basil Essential Oil is amongst the oils that can help stimulate the mind and help with focus. Basil Essential Oil is an energizing oil and is best used during the morning and daytime hours.

It is considered anti-bacterial/anti-viral, it acts as an expectorant and it also helps keep you alert. Basil Oil is also said to help with headaches, though it’s not one commonly used for that purpose.

The chemical composition of Basil Essential Oil can vary greatly between varieties, batches and suppliers. Ideally, look for Basil Essential Oil that has a a significant percentage of Linalool and that is weak in Methyl Chavicol (Estragole), a suspected carcinogen. Basil Oils that are higher in Linalool tend to have a more appealing aroma. Additionally, Linalool is said to act as an insect repellent

Basil can easily dominate a blend. Go easy on the ratio of Basil Oil that you add to blends until you are more familiar with working with it, and be sure to heed all safety precautions.

  • Botanical Name – Ocimum basilicum
  • Common Method of Extraction – Steam Distilled
  • Part Typically Used – Leaves and Flowers/Buds
  • Color – Clear
  • Consistency – Thin
  • Perfumery Note – Top
  • Strength of Initial Aroma – Medium

Aromatic Description

Basil Essential Oil smells sweet, herbaceous and somewhat licorice-like.

Basil Essential Oil Uses

  • Bronchitis
  • Colds
  • Coughs
  • Exhaustion
  • Flatulence
  • Flu
  • Gout
  • Insect Bites
  • Insect Repellent
  • Muscle Aches
  • Rheumatism
  • Sinusitis

Source: Julia Lawless, The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Updated Edition) (London: Harper Thorsons, 2014), 45-46.

Major Constituents

  • Linalool
  • Fenchol
  • Eugenol
  • Methyl Chavicol
  • Beta-Caryophyllene

Source: Shirley Price, The Aromatherapy Workbook (Hammersmith, London: Thorsons, 1993), 54-55.

Basil Essential Oil Safety Information

Use Basil Oil sparingly and with caution. High doses may be carcinogenic especially for those basils that contain a significant amount of methyl chavicol (Eugenole). Tisserand and Young suggest a dermal maximum of 15% if the estragole content does not exceed 0.8%. Reading Tisserand and Young’s full profile is recommended. [Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 208.]

Avoid Basil Oil during pregnancy. [Julia Lawless, The Illustrated Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Rockport, MA: Element Books, 1995), 186.]

Bay

Bergamont

The aroma of Bergamot Essential Oil is reminiscent to that of orange, but it is wonderfully more complex. It almost seems to possess an underlying floral characteristic to it. Drinkers of Earl Gray tea are especially familiar with the flavor and aroma of bergamot as the oil is used to flavor the tea.

Bergamot Essential Oil may be helpful in use during periods of depression, sadness or grief, and it is known for its ability to help combat oily skin and acne.

Because cold pressed Bergamot Essential Oil it is highly phototoxic, it must be used with care on the skin and avoided when exposed to the sun or UV rays. Bergaptene is the naturally occurring constituent found in cold pressed Bergamot Essential Oil that makes the cold pressed oil highly phototoxic. Varieties of furocoumarin-free (FCF) cold pressed Bergamot Essential Oil are available that have the bergaptene removed. Bergamot Essential Oil is also sometimes available as a steam distilled oil.

  • Botanical Name – Basil Essential Oil smells sweet, herbaceous and somewhat licorice-like.
  • Common Method of Extraction – Cold Pressed or Steam Distilled (less frequently)
  • Plant Part Typically Used – Citrus Rind (Peel)
  • Color – Green/Golden
  • Consistency – Thin
  • Perfumery Note – Top
  • Strength of Initial Aroma – Medium

Aromatic Description

Bergamot Essential Oil smells citrusy and possesses a beautifully complex aroma with underlying floral and bitter characteristics.

Bergamot Essential Oil Uses

  • Acne
  • Abscesses
  • Anxiety
  • Boils
  • Cold Sores
  • Cystitis
  • Depression
  • Halitosis
  • Itching
  • Loss of Appetite
  • Oily Skin
  • Psoriasis
  • Stress

Source: Julia Lawless, The Encyclopedia of Essential Oils (Updated Edition) (London: Harper Thorsons, 2014), 48-49.

Major Constituents

  • (+)-Limonene
  • Linalyl Acetate
  • Linalool
  • Sabinene
  • Gamma-Terpinene
  • Bergapten

See Essential Oil Safety for a more complete list of typical constituents.

Source: B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1981-1987 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1989), 39-40. B.M. Lawrence, Essential Oils 1988-1991 (Wheaton: Allured Publishing, 1993), 7, 175.A. Verzera, A. Trozzi, I. Stagno D’Alcontres, et al., The Composition of the Volatile Fraction of Calabrian Bergamot Essential Oil. (Riv. Ital. EEPOS 25, 1998), 17-38. P. Dugo, L. Mondello, A.R. Proteggente, et al., Oxygen Heterocyclic Compounds of Bergamot Essential Oils. (Rivista Italiana EPPOS 27, 1999), 31-41. SCCP, Opinion on Furocoumarins in Cosmetic Products. (Scientific Committee on Consumer Products, 13-Dec.-2005), SCCP/0942/05. Sources cited in Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 211.

Bergamot Essential Oil Safety Information

Cold pressed Bergamot Oil is phototoxic. Tisserand and Young recommend a dermal maximum use of 0.4% to avoid phototoxicity. Reading Tisserand and Young’s full profile on this oil is recommended. [Robert Tisserand and Rodney Young, Essential Oil Safety (Second Edition. United Kingdom: Churchill Livingstone Elsevier, 2014), 87, 211.] Rectified FCF/Bergaptine-Free versions of cold pressed Bergamot Oil are available that dramatically reduce the phototoxicity of the oil.

Black Pepper

Cajuput

Cardamom

Cassia

Cedarwood

Chammomile

Cinnamon

Clary Sage

Clove

Coriander

Cyprus

Eucalytus

Fennel

Frankinscence

Geranium

Ginger

Grapefruit

Ho Leaf

Ho Wood

Hyssop

Jasmine

Juniper

Lavender

Lemon

Lemongrass

Lime

Mandarin

Marjoram

Melissa

Myrrh

Myrtle

Neroli

Niaouli

Nutmeg

Oakmoss

Orange

Palma Rosa

Patchouli

Peppermint

Petitgrain

Pine

Ravensara

Rose

Rosemary

Rosewood

Sage

Sandalwood

Spearmint

Spikewood

Tagetes

Tangerine

Tea Tree

Thyme

Valerian

Vanilla

Verbena

Vetiver

Yarrow

Ylang Ylang

General Safety Information

Do not take any oils internally and do not apply undiluted essential oils, absolutes, CO2s or other concentrated essences onto the skin without advanced essential oil knowledge or consultation from a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. . If you are pregnant, epileptic, have liver damage, have cancer, or have any other medical problem, use oils only under the proper guidance of a qualified aromatherapy practitioner. Use extreme caution when using oils with children. Consult a qualified aromatherapy practitioner before using oils with children, the elderly, if you have medical issues or are taking medications.

Important Information About the Profiles

The essential oil information provided on HD therapy is intended for educational purposes only. The references to safety information, constituents and percentages is generalised information. The data is not necessary complete and is not guaranteed to be accurate. The essential oil photos are intended to represent the typical and approximate color of each essential oil. However, essential oil color can vary based on harvesting, distillation, age of the essential oil and other factors.